Title VII Explained . . .

Let’s get straight to it: there are Americans who don’t want to take the vaccine, but also don’t want to be fired for not taking it. That’s where Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 comes in. This federal law, which applies to all 50 states and every American territory, requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for both legitimately-held religious beliefs and medical exemptions.

Straight out of 42 U.S. Code § 2000e-2, what you need to know is there in black and white:

“It shall be unlawful employment practice for an employer -- (1) to fail or refuse to hire or discharge any individual, or otherwise to discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; or (2) to limit, segregate, or classify his employees or applicants for employment in any way which would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his status as an employee, because of such individual’s race, color, religion, sex or national origin.” (emphasis added)

Religious exemptions should, and must be accommodated, under the law.

Additionally, Title VII's protections extend to nonreligious beliefs if related to morality, and ultimate ideas about life, purpose and death. 
 
We’re not making it up as we go along, they are.




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